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Case Study – IRS Wage Garnishment

July 19, 2011

When a person finds themselves owing the IRS or a state taxing authority, it can be the most terrifying experience of their life.  Owing the government can be quite stressful.   The government has the ability to seize your bank accounts, garnish your wages, or even visit your home or workplace unexpectedly.   There is nothing scarier than an unexpected visit from the IRS. You feel alone and helpless and don’t know where to turn.

While it is always best to address tax problems before they get out of hand, it is important to remember that no matter what stage of collection you are in, the key issue is to go get competent help.  Recently, we have had clients who were in, what appeared to be, a hopeless position.   They had just received a wage garnishment and were in a position to be left with a very minimal amount of money to live on.    Within two days of the client calling my office, we had established contact with the IRS, secured a release of the wage garnishment, and entered into an agreement with the IRS regarding an installment agreement.   The client was able to resume life and continues to make payments pursuant to the installment agreement.

Ideally, the client wouldn’t have waited so long to contact my firm but we had to deal with the hand that the client dealt us.  We acted in a way that every client should expect to be treated.  We didn’t judge them.   We didn’t run from them.  We got all of the necessary information and took action immediately on their behalf.

I think that this example best exemplifies the philosophy of my law firm; we take the clients that we believe we can help and we provide them with the service they deserve. In this case, we acted immediately.  The clients provided us with the information that we needed to get the results they needed.

Remember that it is never too late to get help with your tax problem and that you should always find the right person who can get you the results you need.

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From → Tax

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